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Pro. Yoh Iwasa was elected as a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Science

Release date: 2006.07.10

 

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Professor Yoh Iwasa, Faculty of Sciences, was chosen as a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The American Academy of Arts and Sciences was established in 1786, and being inducted as a member is considered the highest honor in the U.S., as it symbolizes great influence of the receiver on the time. On this occasion, 175 people were chosen to be new members, and 20 people were chosen to be new foreign honorary members, all of whom are active in academia, art, and public and private organizations.


Professor Yoh Iwasa specializes in mathematical biology and has worked on the analysis of biological phenomena based on optimal control theory and game theory that have been developed in the field of engineering and economics. In recent years, he has worked on advanced research that cover a wide range of topics from ecology such as forest dynamics, extinction risk of field organisms and cooperative activities by humans, to molecular biology such as pattern formation of organisms in developmental processes, evolution of genomic imprinting, and dynamics of cancer cells.


The selected members for this year include Mr. George H.W. Bush and Mr. William Jefferson Clinton, who have served as former Presidents of the U.S., and foreign honorary members in the past include Mr. Akito Arima (former President, The University of Tokyo) and Mr. Ryoji Noyori (President of RIKEN]).


Professor Takashi Gojobori, National Institute of Genetics, was also elected as a foreign honorary member. Mr. Gojobori is a graduate of Kyushu University (received his PhD from the Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University in 1979) and serves as a domestic specialist committee member in Kyushu University 21COE project "Integrated Life Science".
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